Genetic diversity among ancient Nordic populations

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Standard

Genetic diversity among ancient Nordic populations. / Melchior, Linea Cecilie; Lynnerup, Niels; Siegismund, Hans Redlef; Kivisild, Toomas; Dissing, Jørgen.

I: PLOS ONE, Bind 5, Nr. 7, e11898, 2010.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Melchior, LC, Lynnerup, N, Siegismund, HR, Kivisild, T & Dissing, J 2010, 'Genetic diversity among ancient Nordic populations', PLOS ONE, bind 5, nr. 7, e11898. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0011898

APA

Melchior, L. C., Lynnerup, N., Siegismund, H. R., Kivisild, T., & Dissing, J. (2010). Genetic diversity among ancient Nordic populations. PLOS ONE, 5(7), [e11898]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0011898

Vancouver

Melchior LC, Lynnerup N, Siegismund HR, Kivisild T, Dissing J. Genetic diversity among ancient Nordic populations. PLOS ONE. 2010;5(7). e11898. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0011898

Author

Melchior, Linea Cecilie ; Lynnerup, Niels ; Siegismund, Hans Redlef ; Kivisild, Toomas ; Dissing, Jørgen. / Genetic diversity among ancient Nordic populations. I: PLOS ONE. 2010 ; Bind 5, Nr. 7.

Bibtex

@article{ac0c5d50a47311df928f000ea68e967b,
title = "Genetic diversity among ancient Nordic populations",
abstract = "Using established criteria for work with fossil DNA we have analysed mitochondrial DNA from 92 individuals from 18 locations in Denmark ranging in time from the Mesolithic to the Medieval Age. Unequivocal assignment of mtDNA haplotypes was possible for 56 of the ancient individuals; however, the success rate varied substantially between sites; the highest rates were obtained with untouched, freshly excavated material, whereas heavy handling, archeological preservation and storage for many years influenced the ability to obtain authentic endogenic DNA. While the nucleotide diversity at two locations was similar to that among extant Danes, the diversity at four sites was considerably higher. This supports previous observations for ancient Britons. The overall occurrence of haplogroups did not deviate from extant Scandinavians, however, haplogroup I was significantly more frequent among the ancient Danes (average 13{\%}) than among extant Danes and Scandinavians ( approximately 2.5{\%}) as well as among other ancient population samples reported. Haplogroup I could therefore have been an ancient Southern Scandinavian type {"}diluted{"} by later immigration events. Interestingly, the two Neolithic samples (4,200 YBP, Bell Beaker culture) that were typed were haplogroup U4 and U5a, respectively, and the single Bronze Age sample (3,300-3,500 YBP) was haplogroup U4. These two haplogroups have been associated with the Mesolithic populations of Central and Northern Europe. Therefore, at least for Southern Scandinavia, our findings do not support a possible replacement of a haplogroup U dominated hunter-gatherer population by a more haplogroup diverse Neolithic Culture.",
author = "Melchior, {Linea Cecilie} and Niels Lynnerup and Siegismund, {Hans Redlef} and Toomas Kivisild and J{\o}rgen Dissing",
year = "2010",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0011898",
language = "English",
volume = "5",
journal = "P L o S One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "7",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Genetic diversity among ancient Nordic populations

AU - Melchior, Linea Cecilie

AU - Lynnerup, Niels

AU - Siegismund, Hans Redlef

AU - Kivisild, Toomas

AU - Dissing, Jørgen

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - Using established criteria for work with fossil DNA we have analysed mitochondrial DNA from 92 individuals from 18 locations in Denmark ranging in time from the Mesolithic to the Medieval Age. Unequivocal assignment of mtDNA haplotypes was possible for 56 of the ancient individuals; however, the success rate varied substantially between sites; the highest rates were obtained with untouched, freshly excavated material, whereas heavy handling, archeological preservation and storage for many years influenced the ability to obtain authentic endogenic DNA. While the nucleotide diversity at two locations was similar to that among extant Danes, the diversity at four sites was considerably higher. This supports previous observations for ancient Britons. The overall occurrence of haplogroups did not deviate from extant Scandinavians, however, haplogroup I was significantly more frequent among the ancient Danes (average 13%) than among extant Danes and Scandinavians ( approximately 2.5%) as well as among other ancient population samples reported. Haplogroup I could therefore have been an ancient Southern Scandinavian type "diluted" by later immigration events. Interestingly, the two Neolithic samples (4,200 YBP, Bell Beaker culture) that were typed were haplogroup U4 and U5a, respectively, and the single Bronze Age sample (3,300-3,500 YBP) was haplogroup U4. These two haplogroups have been associated with the Mesolithic populations of Central and Northern Europe. Therefore, at least for Southern Scandinavia, our findings do not support a possible replacement of a haplogroup U dominated hunter-gatherer population by a more haplogroup diverse Neolithic Culture.

AB - Using established criteria for work with fossil DNA we have analysed mitochondrial DNA from 92 individuals from 18 locations in Denmark ranging in time from the Mesolithic to the Medieval Age. Unequivocal assignment of mtDNA haplotypes was possible for 56 of the ancient individuals; however, the success rate varied substantially between sites; the highest rates were obtained with untouched, freshly excavated material, whereas heavy handling, archeological preservation and storage for many years influenced the ability to obtain authentic endogenic DNA. While the nucleotide diversity at two locations was similar to that among extant Danes, the diversity at four sites was considerably higher. This supports previous observations for ancient Britons. The overall occurrence of haplogroups did not deviate from extant Scandinavians, however, haplogroup I was significantly more frequent among the ancient Danes (average 13%) than among extant Danes and Scandinavians ( approximately 2.5%) as well as among other ancient population samples reported. Haplogroup I could therefore have been an ancient Southern Scandinavian type "diluted" by later immigration events. Interestingly, the two Neolithic samples (4,200 YBP, Bell Beaker culture) that were typed were haplogroup U4 and U5a, respectively, and the single Bronze Age sample (3,300-3,500 YBP) was haplogroup U4. These two haplogroups have been associated with the Mesolithic populations of Central and Northern Europe. Therefore, at least for Southern Scandinavia, our findings do not support a possible replacement of a haplogroup U dominated hunter-gatherer population by a more haplogroup diverse Neolithic Culture.

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0011898

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0011898

M3 - Journal article

VL - 5

JO - P L o S One

JF - P L o S One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 7

M1 - e11898

ER -

ID: 21307773