Multicohort study of change in job strain, poor mental health and incident cardiometabolic disease

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Standard

Multicohort study of change in job strain, poor mental health and incident cardiometabolic disease. / Magnusson Hanson, Linda L; Rod, Naja Hulvej; Vahtera, Jussi; Peristera, Paraskevi; Pentti, Jaana; Rugulies, Reiner; Madsen, Ida Elisabeth Huitfeldt; LaMontagne, Anthony D; Milner, Allison; Lange, Theis; Suominen, Sakari; Stenholm, Sari; Xu, Tianwei; Kivimäki, Mika; Westerlund, Hugo.

I: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Bind 76, Nr. 11, 105595, 2019.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Magnusson Hanson, LL, Rod, NH, Vahtera, J, Peristera, P, Pentti, J, Rugulies, R, Madsen, IEH, LaMontagne, AD, Milner, A, Lange, T, Suominen, S, Stenholm, S, Xu, T, Kivimäki, M & Westerlund, H 2019, 'Multicohort study of change in job strain, poor mental health and incident cardiometabolic disease', Occupational and Environmental Medicine, bind 76, nr. 11, 105595. https://doi.org/10.1136/oemed-2018-105595

APA

Magnusson Hanson, L. L., Rod, N. H., Vahtera, J., Peristera, P., Pentti, J., Rugulies, R., ... Westerlund, H. (2019). Multicohort study of change in job strain, poor mental health and incident cardiometabolic disease. Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 76(11), [105595]. https://doi.org/10.1136/oemed-2018-105595

Vancouver

Magnusson Hanson LL, Rod NH, Vahtera J, Peristera P, Pentti J, Rugulies R o.a. Multicohort study of change in job strain, poor mental health and incident cardiometabolic disease. Occupational and Environmental Medicine. 2019;76(11). 105595. https://doi.org/10.1136/oemed-2018-105595

Author

Magnusson Hanson, Linda L ; Rod, Naja Hulvej ; Vahtera, Jussi ; Peristera, Paraskevi ; Pentti, Jaana ; Rugulies, Reiner ; Madsen, Ida Elisabeth Huitfeldt ; LaMontagne, Anthony D ; Milner, Allison ; Lange, Theis ; Suominen, Sakari ; Stenholm, Sari ; Xu, Tianwei ; Kivimäki, Mika ; Westerlund, Hugo. / Multicohort study of change in job strain, poor mental health and incident cardiometabolic disease. I: Occupational and Environmental Medicine. 2019 ; Bind 76, Nr. 11.

Bibtex

@article{6fd7fe3181fe4d5abfa1736cc5f6f284,
title = "Multicohort study of change in job strain, poor mental health and incident cardiometabolic disease",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: Several recent large-scale studies have indicated a prospective association between job strain and coronary heart disease, stroke and diabetes. Job strain is also associated with poorer mental health, a risk factor for cardiometabolic disease. This study investigates the prospective relationships between change in job strain, poor mental health and cardiometabolic disease, and whether poor mental health is a potential mediator of the relationship between job strain and cardiometabolic disease.METHODS: We used data from five cohort studies from Australia, Finland, Sweden and UK, including 47 757 men and women. Data on job strain across two measurements 1-5 years apart (time 1 (T1)-time 2 (T2)) were used to define increase or decrease in job strain. Poor mental health (symptoms in the top 25{\%} of the distribution of the scales) at T2 was considered a potential mediator in relation to incident cardiometabolic disease, including cardiovascular disease and diabetes, following T2 for a mean of 5-18 years.RESULTS: An increase in job strain was associated with poor mental health (HR 1.56, 95{\%} CI 1.38 to 1.76), and a decrease in job strain was associated with lower risk in women (HR 0.70, 95{\%} CI 0.60-0.84). However, no clear association was observed between poor mental health and incident cardiometabolic disease (HR 1.08, 95{\%} CI 0.96-1.23), nor between increase (HR 1.01, 95{\%} CI 0.90-1.14) and decrease (HR 1.08, 95{\%} CI 0.96-1.22) in job strain and cardiometabolic disease.CONCLUSIONS: The results did not support that change in job strain is a risk factor for cardiometabolic disease and yielded no support for poor mental health as a mediator.",
author = "{Magnusson Hanson}, {Linda L} and Rod, {Naja Hulvej} and Jussi Vahtera and Paraskevi Peristera and Jaana Pentti and Reiner Rugulies and Madsen, {Ida Elisabeth Huitfeldt} and LaMontagne, {Anthony D} and Allison Milner and Theis Lange and Sakari Suominen and Sari Stenholm and Tianwei Xu and Mika Kivim{\"a}ki and Hugo Westerlund",
note = "{\circledC} Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2019. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1136/oemed-2018-105595",
language = "English",
volume = "76",
journal = "Occupational and Environmental Medicine",
issn = "1351-0711",
publisher = "B M J Group",
number = "11",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Multicohort study of change in job strain, poor mental health and incident cardiometabolic disease

AU - Magnusson Hanson, Linda L

AU - Rod, Naja Hulvej

AU - Vahtera, Jussi

AU - Peristera, Paraskevi

AU - Pentti, Jaana

AU - Rugulies, Reiner

AU - Madsen, Ida Elisabeth Huitfeldt

AU - LaMontagne, Anthony D

AU - Milner, Allison

AU - Lange, Theis

AU - Suominen, Sakari

AU - Stenholm, Sari

AU - Xu, Tianwei

AU - Kivimäki, Mika

AU - Westerlund, Hugo

N1 - © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2019. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - OBJECTIVES: Several recent large-scale studies have indicated a prospective association between job strain and coronary heart disease, stroke and diabetes. Job strain is also associated with poorer mental health, a risk factor for cardiometabolic disease. This study investigates the prospective relationships between change in job strain, poor mental health and cardiometabolic disease, and whether poor mental health is a potential mediator of the relationship between job strain and cardiometabolic disease.METHODS: We used data from five cohort studies from Australia, Finland, Sweden and UK, including 47 757 men and women. Data on job strain across two measurements 1-5 years apart (time 1 (T1)-time 2 (T2)) were used to define increase or decrease in job strain. Poor mental health (symptoms in the top 25% of the distribution of the scales) at T2 was considered a potential mediator in relation to incident cardiometabolic disease, including cardiovascular disease and diabetes, following T2 for a mean of 5-18 years.RESULTS: An increase in job strain was associated with poor mental health (HR 1.56, 95% CI 1.38 to 1.76), and a decrease in job strain was associated with lower risk in women (HR 0.70, 95% CI 0.60-0.84). However, no clear association was observed between poor mental health and incident cardiometabolic disease (HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.96-1.23), nor between increase (HR 1.01, 95% CI 0.90-1.14) and decrease (HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.96-1.22) in job strain and cardiometabolic disease.CONCLUSIONS: The results did not support that change in job strain is a risk factor for cardiometabolic disease and yielded no support for poor mental health as a mediator.

AB - OBJECTIVES: Several recent large-scale studies have indicated a prospective association between job strain and coronary heart disease, stroke and diabetes. Job strain is also associated with poorer mental health, a risk factor for cardiometabolic disease. This study investigates the prospective relationships between change in job strain, poor mental health and cardiometabolic disease, and whether poor mental health is a potential mediator of the relationship between job strain and cardiometabolic disease.METHODS: We used data from five cohort studies from Australia, Finland, Sweden and UK, including 47 757 men and women. Data on job strain across two measurements 1-5 years apart (time 1 (T1)-time 2 (T2)) were used to define increase or decrease in job strain. Poor mental health (symptoms in the top 25% of the distribution of the scales) at T2 was considered a potential mediator in relation to incident cardiometabolic disease, including cardiovascular disease and diabetes, following T2 for a mean of 5-18 years.RESULTS: An increase in job strain was associated with poor mental health (HR 1.56, 95% CI 1.38 to 1.76), and a decrease in job strain was associated with lower risk in women (HR 0.70, 95% CI 0.60-0.84). However, no clear association was observed between poor mental health and incident cardiometabolic disease (HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.96-1.23), nor between increase (HR 1.01, 95% CI 0.90-1.14) and decrease (HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.96-1.22) in job strain and cardiometabolic disease.CONCLUSIONS: The results did not support that change in job strain is a risk factor for cardiometabolic disease and yielded no support for poor mental health as a mediator.

U2 - 10.1136/oemed-2018-105595

DO - 10.1136/oemed-2018-105595

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 31488605

VL - 76

JO - Occupational and Environmental Medicine

JF - Occupational and Environmental Medicine

SN - 1351-0711

IS - 11

M1 - 105595

ER -

ID: 227515863