Film som kunst: Yinka Shonibare and Black British film

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Standard

Film som kunst : Yinka Shonibare and Black British film. / Petersen, Anne Ring.

I: Passepartout, Bind 18, Nr. 34, 2013, s. 66-86.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Petersen, AR 2013, 'Film som kunst: Yinka Shonibare and Black British film', Passepartout, bind 18, nr. 34, s. 66-86.

APA

Petersen, A. R. (2013). Film som kunst: Yinka Shonibare and Black British film. Passepartout, 18(34), 66-86.

Vancouver

Petersen AR. Film som kunst: Yinka Shonibare and Black British film. Passepartout. 2013;18(34):66-86.

Author

Petersen, Anne Ring. / Film som kunst : Yinka Shonibare and Black British film. I: Passepartout. 2013 ; Bind 18, Nr. 34. s. 66-86.

Bibtex

@article{1ff29559cbfb4d1b8a8b9faf75c26f61,
title = "Film som kunst: Yinka Shonibare and Black British film",
abstract = "Films by artists induce scholars to work across art, film and cultural history. Accordingly, this article adopts an interdisciplinary approach to the British-Nigerian artist Yinka Shonibare’s film Un Ballo in Maschera (2004). The film is grounded in Shonibare’s unique use of African-print fabric in conjunction with references to European cultural and political history, but the film is also – it is alleged – rooted in Black British cinema and the transnational postcolonialism which emerged in the UK of the 1980s. The article starts with a general introduction to Shonibare’s art and the colonial connotations of the African-print fabric, which are also central to the critique of power in Un Ballo in Maschera. Its critical agenda is then analysed and put into historical perspective by relating the film to Black British film. A comparison with the Black Audio Film Collective’s key work Handsworth Songs (1986) substantiates the article’s assumption that Shonibare picks up the BAFC legacy of interrogating the official constructions of history in ways that lead to a politically invested, yet poetic and sensuous filmic rewriting of history.",
keywords = "Det Humanistiske Fakultet, samtidskunst, film, postkolonialisme, Black British Film, transnationalisme, contemporary art, film, postcolonial discourse, Black British Film, transnationalism",
author = "Petersen, {Anne Ring}",
year = "2013",
language = "Dansk",
volume = "18",
pages = "66--86",
journal = "Passepartout",
issn = "0908-5351",
publisher = "Aarhus Universitetsforlag",
number = "34",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Film som kunst

T2 - Yinka Shonibare and Black British film

AU - Petersen, Anne Ring

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Films by artists induce scholars to work across art, film and cultural history. Accordingly, this article adopts an interdisciplinary approach to the British-Nigerian artist Yinka Shonibare’s film Un Ballo in Maschera (2004). The film is grounded in Shonibare’s unique use of African-print fabric in conjunction with references to European cultural and political history, but the film is also – it is alleged – rooted in Black British cinema and the transnational postcolonialism which emerged in the UK of the 1980s. The article starts with a general introduction to Shonibare’s art and the colonial connotations of the African-print fabric, which are also central to the critique of power in Un Ballo in Maschera. Its critical agenda is then analysed and put into historical perspective by relating the film to Black British film. A comparison with the Black Audio Film Collective’s key work Handsworth Songs (1986) substantiates the article’s assumption that Shonibare picks up the BAFC legacy of interrogating the official constructions of history in ways that lead to a politically invested, yet poetic and sensuous filmic rewriting of history.

AB - Films by artists induce scholars to work across art, film and cultural history. Accordingly, this article adopts an interdisciplinary approach to the British-Nigerian artist Yinka Shonibare’s film Un Ballo in Maschera (2004). The film is grounded in Shonibare’s unique use of African-print fabric in conjunction with references to European cultural and political history, but the film is also – it is alleged – rooted in Black British cinema and the transnational postcolonialism which emerged in the UK of the 1980s. The article starts with a general introduction to Shonibare’s art and the colonial connotations of the African-print fabric, which are also central to the critique of power in Un Ballo in Maschera. Its critical agenda is then analysed and put into historical perspective by relating the film to Black British film. A comparison with the Black Audio Film Collective’s key work Handsworth Songs (1986) substantiates the article’s assumption that Shonibare picks up the BAFC legacy of interrogating the official constructions of history in ways that lead to a politically invested, yet poetic and sensuous filmic rewriting of history.

KW - Det Humanistiske Fakultet

KW - samtidskunst

KW - film

KW - postkolonialisme

KW - Black British Film

KW - transnationalisme

KW - contemporary art

KW - film

KW - postcolonial discourse

KW - Black British Film

KW - transnationalism

M3 - Tidsskriftartikel

VL - 18

SP - 66

EP - 86

JO - Passepartout

JF - Passepartout

SN - 0908-5351

IS - 34

ER -

ID: 91807426