Tumor initiating but differentiated luminal-like breast cancer cells are highly invasive in the absence of basal-like activity

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Standard

Tumor initiating but differentiated luminal-like breast cancer cells are highly invasive in the absence of basal-like activity. / Kim, Jiyoung; Villadsen, René; Sørlie, Therese; Fogh, Louise; Grønlund, Signe Z.; Fridriksdóttir, Agla Jael Rubner; Kuhn, Irene; Rank, Fritz; Wielenga, Vera Timmermans; Solvang, Hiroko; Edwards, Paul A.W.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Rønnov-Jessen, Lone; Bissell, Mina J.; Petersen, Ole William.

I: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Bind 109, Nr. 16, 2012, s. 6124-6129.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Kim, J, Villadsen, R, Sørlie, T, Fogh, L, Grønlund, SZ, Fridriksdóttir, AJR, Kuhn, I, Rank, F, Wielenga, VT, Solvang, H, Edwards, PAW, Børresen-Dale, A-L, Rønnov-Jessen, L, Bissell, MJ & Petersen, OW 2012, 'Tumor initiating but differentiated luminal-like breast cancer cells are highly invasive in the absence of basal-like activity', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, bind 109, nr. 16, s. 6124-6129. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1203203109

APA

Kim, J., Villadsen, R., Sørlie, T., Fogh, L., Grønlund, S. Z., Fridriksdóttir, A. J. R., ... Petersen, O. W. (2012). Tumor initiating but differentiated luminal-like breast cancer cells are highly invasive in the absence of basal-like activity. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 109(16), 6124-6129. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1203203109

Vancouver

Kim J, Villadsen R, Sørlie T, Fogh L, Grønlund SZ, Fridriksdóttir AJR o.a. Tumor initiating but differentiated luminal-like breast cancer cells are highly invasive in the absence of basal-like activity. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2012;109(16):6124-6129. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1203203109

Author

Kim, Jiyoung ; Villadsen, René ; Sørlie, Therese ; Fogh, Louise ; Grønlund, Signe Z. ; Fridriksdóttir, Agla Jael Rubner ; Kuhn, Irene ; Rank, Fritz ; Wielenga, Vera Timmermans ; Solvang, Hiroko ; Edwards, Paul A.W. ; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise ; Rønnov-Jessen, Lone ; Bissell, Mina J. ; Petersen, Ole William. / Tumor initiating but differentiated luminal-like breast cancer cells are highly invasive in the absence of basal-like activity. I: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2012 ; Bind 109, Nr. 16. s. 6124-6129.

Bibtex

@article{01878ab1c1de4d009e44987bf2213db6,
title = "Tumor initiating but differentiated luminal-like breast cancer cells are highly invasive in the absence of basal-like activity",
abstract = "The majority of human breast cancers exhibit luminal epithelial differentiation. However, most aggressive behavior, including invasion and purported cancer stem cell activity, are considered characteristics of basal-like cells. We asked the following questions: Must luminal-like breast cancer cells become basal-like to initiate tumors or to invade? Could luminally differentiated cells within a basally initiated hierarchy also be tumorigenic? To answer these questions, we used rare and mutually exclusive lineage markers to isolate subsets of luminal-like and basal-like cells from human breast tumors. We enriched for populations with or without prominent basal-like traits from individual tumors or single cell cloning from cell lines and recovered cells with a luminal-like phenotype. Tumor cells with basal-like traits mimicked phenotypic and functional behavior associated with stem cells assessed by gene expression, mammosphere formation and lineage markers. Luminal-like cells without basal-like traits, surprisingly, were fully capable of initiating invasive tumors in NOD SCID gamma (NSG) mice. In fact, these phenotypically pure luminal-like cells generated larger and more invasive tumors than their basal-like counterparts. The tumorigenicity and invasive potential of the luminal-like cancer cells relied strongly on the expression of the gene GCNT1, which encodes a key glycosyltransferase controlling O-glycan branching. These findings demonstrate that basal-like cells, as defined currently, are not a requirement for breast tumor aggressiveness, and that within a single tumor there are multiple {"}stem-like{"} cells with tumorigenic potential casting some doubt on the hypothesis of hierarchical or differentiative loss of tumorigenicity.",
author = "Jiyoung Kim and Ren{\'e} Villadsen and Therese S{\o}rlie and Louise Fogh and Gr{\o}nlund, {Signe Z.} and Fridriksd{\'o}ttir, {Agla Jael Rubner} and Irene Kuhn and Fritz Rank and Wielenga, {Vera Timmermans} and Hiroko Solvang and Edwards, {Paul A.W.} and Anne-Lise B{\o}rresen-Dale and Lone R{\o}nnov-Jessen and Bissell, {Mina J.} and Petersen, {Ole William}",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1073/pnas.1203203109",
language = "English",
volume = "109",
pages = "6124--6129",
journal = "Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America",
issn = "0027-8424",
publisher = "The National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America",
number = "16",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Tumor initiating but differentiated luminal-like breast cancer cells are highly invasive in the absence of basal-like activity

AU - Kim, Jiyoung

AU - Villadsen, René

AU - Sørlie, Therese

AU - Fogh, Louise

AU - Grønlund, Signe Z.

AU - Fridriksdóttir, Agla Jael Rubner

AU - Kuhn, Irene

AU - Rank, Fritz

AU - Wielenga, Vera Timmermans

AU - Solvang, Hiroko

AU - Edwards, Paul A.W.

AU - Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise

AU - Rønnov-Jessen, Lone

AU - Bissell, Mina J.

AU - Petersen, Ole William

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - The majority of human breast cancers exhibit luminal epithelial differentiation. However, most aggressive behavior, including invasion and purported cancer stem cell activity, are considered characteristics of basal-like cells. We asked the following questions: Must luminal-like breast cancer cells become basal-like to initiate tumors or to invade? Could luminally differentiated cells within a basally initiated hierarchy also be tumorigenic? To answer these questions, we used rare and mutually exclusive lineage markers to isolate subsets of luminal-like and basal-like cells from human breast tumors. We enriched for populations with or without prominent basal-like traits from individual tumors or single cell cloning from cell lines and recovered cells with a luminal-like phenotype. Tumor cells with basal-like traits mimicked phenotypic and functional behavior associated with stem cells assessed by gene expression, mammosphere formation and lineage markers. Luminal-like cells without basal-like traits, surprisingly, were fully capable of initiating invasive tumors in NOD SCID gamma (NSG) mice. In fact, these phenotypically pure luminal-like cells generated larger and more invasive tumors than their basal-like counterparts. The tumorigenicity and invasive potential of the luminal-like cancer cells relied strongly on the expression of the gene GCNT1, which encodes a key glycosyltransferase controlling O-glycan branching. These findings demonstrate that basal-like cells, as defined currently, are not a requirement for breast tumor aggressiveness, and that within a single tumor there are multiple "stem-like" cells with tumorigenic potential casting some doubt on the hypothesis of hierarchical or differentiative loss of tumorigenicity.

AB - The majority of human breast cancers exhibit luminal epithelial differentiation. However, most aggressive behavior, including invasion and purported cancer stem cell activity, are considered characteristics of basal-like cells. We asked the following questions: Must luminal-like breast cancer cells become basal-like to initiate tumors or to invade? Could luminally differentiated cells within a basally initiated hierarchy also be tumorigenic? To answer these questions, we used rare and mutually exclusive lineage markers to isolate subsets of luminal-like and basal-like cells from human breast tumors. We enriched for populations with or without prominent basal-like traits from individual tumors or single cell cloning from cell lines and recovered cells with a luminal-like phenotype. Tumor cells with basal-like traits mimicked phenotypic and functional behavior associated with stem cells assessed by gene expression, mammosphere formation and lineage markers. Luminal-like cells without basal-like traits, surprisingly, were fully capable of initiating invasive tumors in NOD SCID gamma (NSG) mice. In fact, these phenotypically pure luminal-like cells generated larger and more invasive tumors than their basal-like counterparts. The tumorigenicity and invasive potential of the luminal-like cancer cells relied strongly on the expression of the gene GCNT1, which encodes a key glycosyltransferase controlling O-glycan branching. These findings demonstrate that basal-like cells, as defined currently, are not a requirement for breast tumor aggressiveness, and that within a single tumor there are multiple "stem-like" cells with tumorigenic potential casting some doubt on the hypothesis of hierarchical or differentiative loss of tumorigenicity.

U2 - 10.1073/pnas.1203203109

DO - 10.1073/pnas.1203203109

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 22454501

VL - 109

SP - 6124

EP - 6129

JO - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

JF - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

SN - 0027-8424

IS - 16

ER -

ID: 38406400