The routine use of antibiotics to promote animal growth does little to benefit protein undernutrition in the developing world

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningfagfællebedømt

Standard

The routine use of antibiotics to promote animal growth does little to benefit protein undernutrition in the developing world. / Collignon, Peter; Wegener, Henrik C.; Braam, Peter; Butler, Colin D.

I: Clinical Infectious Diseases, Bind 41, Nr. 7, 01.10.2005, s. 1007-1013.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Collignon, P, Wegener, HC, Braam, P & Butler, CD 2005, 'The routine use of antibiotics to promote animal growth does little to benefit protein undernutrition in the developing world', Clinical Infectious Diseases, bind 41, nr. 7, s. 1007-1013. https://doi.org/10.1086/433191

APA

Collignon, P., Wegener, H. C., Braam, P., & Butler, C. D. (2005). The routine use of antibiotics to promote animal growth does little to benefit protein undernutrition in the developing world. Clinical Infectious Diseases, 41(7), 1007-1013. https://doi.org/10.1086/433191

Vancouver

Collignon P, Wegener HC, Braam P, Butler CD. The routine use of antibiotics to promote animal growth does little to benefit protein undernutrition in the developing world. Clinical Infectious Diseases. 2005 okt 1;41(7):1007-1013. https://doi.org/10.1086/433191

Author

Collignon, Peter ; Wegener, Henrik C. ; Braam, Peter ; Butler, Colin D. / The routine use of antibiotics to promote animal growth does little to benefit protein undernutrition in the developing world. I: Clinical Infectious Diseases. 2005 ; Bind 41, Nr. 7. s. 1007-1013.

Bibtex

@article{66fc7b5761df4c36997ab34a3df11cdc,
title = "The routine use of antibiotics to promote animal growth does little to benefit protein undernutrition in the developing world",
abstract = "Some persons argue that the routine addition of antibiotics to animal feed will help alleviate protein undernutrition in developing countries by increasing meat production. In contrast, we estimate that, if all routine antibiotic use in animal feed were ceased, there would be negligible effects in these countries. Poultry and pork production are unlikely to decrease by more than 2{\%}. Average daily protein supply would decrease by no more than 0.1 g per person (or 0.2{\%} of total protein intake). Eliminating the routine use of in-feed antibiotics will improve human and animal health, by reducing the development and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.",
author = "Peter Collignon and Wegener, {Henrik C.} and Peter Braam and Butler, {Colin D.}",
year = "2005",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1086/433191",
language = "English",
volume = "41",
pages = "1007--1013",
journal = "Clinical Infectious Diseases",
issn = "1058-4838",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "7",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The routine use of antibiotics to promote animal growth does little to benefit protein undernutrition in the developing world

AU - Collignon, Peter

AU - Wegener, Henrik C.

AU - Braam, Peter

AU - Butler, Colin D.

PY - 2005/10/1

Y1 - 2005/10/1

N2 - Some persons argue that the routine addition of antibiotics to animal feed will help alleviate protein undernutrition in developing countries by increasing meat production. In contrast, we estimate that, if all routine antibiotic use in animal feed were ceased, there would be negligible effects in these countries. Poultry and pork production are unlikely to decrease by more than 2%. Average daily protein supply would decrease by no more than 0.1 g per person (or 0.2% of total protein intake). Eliminating the routine use of in-feed antibiotics will improve human and animal health, by reducing the development and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

AB - Some persons argue that the routine addition of antibiotics to animal feed will help alleviate protein undernutrition in developing countries by increasing meat production. In contrast, we estimate that, if all routine antibiotic use in animal feed were ceased, there would be negligible effects in these countries. Poultry and pork production are unlikely to decrease by more than 2%. Average daily protein supply would decrease by no more than 0.1 g per person (or 0.2% of total protein intake). Eliminating the routine use of in-feed antibiotics will improve human and animal health, by reducing the development and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=25444467152&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1086/433191

DO - 10.1086/433191

M3 - Review

C2 - 16142667

AN - SCOPUS:25444467152

VL - 41

SP - 1007

EP - 1013

JO - Clinical Infectious Diseases

JF - Clinical Infectious Diseases

SN - 1058-4838

IS - 7

ER -

ID: 228689642