Skin problems due to treatment with technology are associated with increased disease burden among adults with type 1 diabetes

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Standard

Skin problems due to treatment with technology are associated with increased disease burden among adults with type 1 diabetes. / Christensen, Maria O.; Berg, Anna K.; Rytter, Karen; Hommel, Eva; Thyssen, Jacob P.; Svensson, Jannet; Nørgaard, Kirsten.

I: Diabetes Technology and Therapeutics, Bind 21, Nr. 4, 2019, s. 215-221.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Christensen, MO, Berg, AK, Rytter, K, Hommel, E, Thyssen, JP, Svensson, J & Nørgaard, K 2019, 'Skin problems due to treatment with technology are associated with increased disease burden among adults with type 1 diabetes', Diabetes Technology and Therapeutics, bind 21, nr. 4, s. 215-221. https://doi.org/10.1089/dia.2019.0007

APA

Christensen, M. O., Berg, A. K., Rytter, K., Hommel, E., Thyssen, J. P., Svensson, J., & Nørgaard, K. (2019). Skin problems due to treatment with technology are associated with increased disease burden among adults with type 1 diabetes. Diabetes Technology and Therapeutics, 21(4), 215-221. https://doi.org/10.1089/dia.2019.0007

Vancouver

Christensen MO, Berg AK, Rytter K, Hommel E, Thyssen JP, Svensson J o.a. Skin problems due to treatment with technology are associated with increased disease burden among adults with type 1 diabetes. Diabetes Technology and Therapeutics. 2019;21(4):215-221. https://doi.org/10.1089/dia.2019.0007

Author

Christensen, Maria O. ; Berg, Anna K. ; Rytter, Karen ; Hommel, Eva ; Thyssen, Jacob P. ; Svensson, Jannet ; Nørgaard, Kirsten. / Skin problems due to treatment with technology are associated with increased disease burden among adults with type 1 diabetes. I: Diabetes Technology and Therapeutics. 2019 ; Bind 21, Nr. 4. s. 215-221.

Bibtex

@article{1a7a2ca8065947d387866bafefb5aba0,
title = "Skin problems due to treatment with technology are associated with increased disease burden among adults with type 1 diabetes",
abstract = "Background: In a 4-month follow-up survey, we examined whether treatment with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) and/or continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in adults with type 1 diabetes was associated with sustained skin problems and whether skin problems were associated with diabetes-related emotional distress. Research Design and Methods: A total of 111 adult patients completed a follow-up questionnaire concerning skin problems as a result of CSII and/or CGM use. The questionnaire included a patient-reported outcome measure, the Problem Areas in Diabetes (PAID) scale. Results: Current visible skin problems caused by CSII or CGM use were reported by 51 (46.0%) participants, in 34 (66.7%) of whom skin problems had been reported more than 4 months earlier. Seventy-two (64.9%) participants reported skin problems as a result of CSII use, whereas 38 (74.5%) reported skin problems owing to CGM use at some time. Itching was the most prevalent complaint. CSII-related itching was associated with a mean PAID score >20 (P = 0.01), and patients with more than one skin problem had an increased PAID score compared with those with one or no skin problems (P = 0.006). Conclusions: More than half patients treated with CSII, CGM, or both had experienced skin problems during 4 months of follow-up that were associated with increased diabetes burden. Skin problems represent a persistent health issue affecting diabetes-specific emotional distress.",
keywords = "Continuous glucose monitoring, Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion, Problem areas in diabetes, Skin problems, Type 1 diabetes.",
author = "Christensen, {Maria O.} and Berg, {Anna K.} and Karen Rytter and Eva Hommel and Thyssen, {Jacob P.} and Jannet Svensson and Kirsten N{\o}rgaard",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1089/dia.2019.0007",
language = "English",
volume = "21",
pages = "215--221",
journal = "Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics",
issn = "1520-9156",
publisher = "Mary AnnLiebert, Inc. Publishers",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Skin problems due to treatment with technology are associated with increased disease burden among adults with type 1 diabetes

AU - Christensen, Maria O.

AU - Berg, Anna K.

AU - Rytter, Karen

AU - Hommel, Eva

AU - Thyssen, Jacob P.

AU - Svensson, Jannet

AU - Nørgaard, Kirsten

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Background: In a 4-month follow-up survey, we examined whether treatment with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) and/or continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in adults with type 1 diabetes was associated with sustained skin problems and whether skin problems were associated with diabetes-related emotional distress. Research Design and Methods: A total of 111 adult patients completed a follow-up questionnaire concerning skin problems as a result of CSII and/or CGM use. The questionnaire included a patient-reported outcome measure, the Problem Areas in Diabetes (PAID) scale. Results: Current visible skin problems caused by CSII or CGM use were reported by 51 (46.0%) participants, in 34 (66.7%) of whom skin problems had been reported more than 4 months earlier. Seventy-two (64.9%) participants reported skin problems as a result of CSII use, whereas 38 (74.5%) reported skin problems owing to CGM use at some time. Itching was the most prevalent complaint. CSII-related itching was associated with a mean PAID score >20 (P = 0.01), and patients with more than one skin problem had an increased PAID score compared with those with one or no skin problems (P = 0.006). Conclusions: More than half patients treated with CSII, CGM, or both had experienced skin problems during 4 months of follow-up that were associated with increased diabetes burden. Skin problems represent a persistent health issue affecting diabetes-specific emotional distress.

AB - Background: In a 4-month follow-up survey, we examined whether treatment with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) and/or continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in adults with type 1 diabetes was associated with sustained skin problems and whether skin problems were associated with diabetes-related emotional distress. Research Design and Methods: A total of 111 adult patients completed a follow-up questionnaire concerning skin problems as a result of CSII and/or CGM use. The questionnaire included a patient-reported outcome measure, the Problem Areas in Diabetes (PAID) scale. Results: Current visible skin problems caused by CSII or CGM use were reported by 51 (46.0%) participants, in 34 (66.7%) of whom skin problems had been reported more than 4 months earlier. Seventy-two (64.9%) participants reported skin problems as a result of CSII use, whereas 38 (74.5%) reported skin problems owing to CGM use at some time. Itching was the most prevalent complaint. CSII-related itching was associated with a mean PAID score >20 (P = 0.01), and patients with more than one skin problem had an increased PAID score compared with those with one or no skin problems (P = 0.006). Conclusions: More than half patients treated with CSII, CGM, or both had experienced skin problems during 4 months of follow-up that were associated with increased diabetes burden. Skin problems represent a persistent health issue affecting diabetes-specific emotional distress.

KW - Continuous glucose monitoring

KW - Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion

KW - Problem areas in diabetes

KW - Skin problems

KW - Type 1 diabetes.

U2 - 10.1089/dia.2019.0007

DO - 10.1089/dia.2019.0007

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 30943072

AN - SCOPUS:85063897867

VL - 21

SP - 215

EP - 221

JO - Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics

JF - Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics

SN - 1520-9156

IS - 4

ER -

ID: 236016226