Radical hopefulness in Mohsin Hamid’s map of the world: A reading of Exit West (2017)

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelfagfællebedømt

Standard

Radical hopefulness in Mohsin Hamid’s map of the world: A reading of Exit West (2017). / bmk613, bmk613; Rahbek, Ulla.

I: Journal of Postcolonial Writing, Bind 57, Nr. 4, 2021, s. 442-454.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelfagfællebedømt

Harvard

bmk613, B & Rahbek, U 2021, 'Radical hopefulness in Mohsin Hamid’s map of the world: A reading of Exit West (2017)', Journal of Postcolonial Writing, bind 57, nr. 4, s. 442-454. https://doi.org/10.1080/17449855.2021.1889641

APA

bmk613, B., & Rahbek, U. (2021). Radical hopefulness in Mohsin Hamid’s map of the world: A reading of Exit West (2017). Journal of Postcolonial Writing, 57(4), 442-454. https://doi.org/10.1080/17449855.2021.1889641

Vancouver

bmk613 B, Rahbek U. Radical hopefulness in Mohsin Hamid’s map of the world: A reading of Exit West (2017). Journal of Postcolonial Writing. 2021;57(4):442-454. https://doi.org/10.1080/17449855.2021.1889641

Author

bmk613, bmk613 ; Rahbek, Ulla. / Radical hopefulness in Mohsin Hamid’s map of the world: A reading of Exit West (2017). I: Journal of Postcolonial Writing. 2021 ; Bind 57, Nr. 4. s. 442-454.

Bibtex

@article{bfaa52ac6a034a938cf940fc69954dad,
title = "Radical hopefulness in Mohsin Hamid{\textquoteright}s map of the world: A reading of Exit West (2017)",
abstract = "With a point of departure in Pheng Cheah{\textquoteright}s idea of world as a temporal-normative category that encompasses universal humanity, this article discusses Mohsin Hamid{\textquoteright}s Exit West as an urgent response to the need to rethink belonging in the current age of globalization and increased mobility across geographical spaces. This response draws on what Hamid calls “radical hopefulness” founded on empathy and solidarity embodied in the novel{\textquoteright}s mapping of a world where migration and prayer are foregrounded as interconnective gestures that bring out shared humanity and hope for a world where “being with” supersedes notions of origin or national belonging. In the novel, migration and prayer pivot on connectivity and alternate ways of being in the world that, in Hamid{\textquoteright}s response, function as radical, if not revolutionary, acts of worlding – in line with Cheah{\textquoteright}s conception of the normative efficacy of world literature.",
author = "bmk613 bmk613 and Ulla Rahbek",
year = "2021",
doi = "10.1080/17449855.2021.1889641",
language = "English",
volume = "57",
pages = "442--454",
journal = "Journal of Postcolonial Writing",
issn = "1744-9855",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Radical hopefulness in Mohsin Hamid’s map of the world: A reading of Exit West (2017)

AU - bmk613, bmk613

AU - Rahbek, Ulla

PY - 2021

Y1 - 2021

N2 - With a point of departure in Pheng Cheah’s idea of world as a temporal-normative category that encompasses universal humanity, this article discusses Mohsin Hamid’s Exit West as an urgent response to the need to rethink belonging in the current age of globalization and increased mobility across geographical spaces. This response draws on what Hamid calls “radical hopefulness” founded on empathy and solidarity embodied in the novel’s mapping of a world where migration and prayer are foregrounded as interconnective gestures that bring out shared humanity and hope for a world where “being with” supersedes notions of origin or national belonging. In the novel, migration and prayer pivot on connectivity and alternate ways of being in the world that, in Hamid’s response, function as radical, if not revolutionary, acts of worlding – in line with Cheah’s conception of the normative efficacy of world literature.

AB - With a point of departure in Pheng Cheah’s idea of world as a temporal-normative category that encompasses universal humanity, this article discusses Mohsin Hamid’s Exit West as an urgent response to the need to rethink belonging in the current age of globalization and increased mobility across geographical spaces. This response draws on what Hamid calls “radical hopefulness” founded on empathy and solidarity embodied in the novel’s mapping of a world where migration and prayer are foregrounded as interconnective gestures that bring out shared humanity and hope for a world where “being with” supersedes notions of origin or national belonging. In the novel, migration and prayer pivot on connectivity and alternate ways of being in the world that, in Hamid’s response, function as radical, if not revolutionary, acts of worlding – in line with Cheah’s conception of the normative efficacy of world literature.

U2 - 10.1080/17449855.2021.1889641

DO - 10.1080/17449855.2021.1889641

M3 - Journal article

VL - 57

SP - 442

EP - 454

JO - Journal of Postcolonial Writing

JF - Journal of Postcolonial Writing

SN - 1744-9855

IS - 4

ER -

ID: 257925952