Longitudinal study of electrical, functional and structural remodelling in an equine model of atrial fibrillation

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Longitudinal study of electrical, functional and structural remodelling in an equine model of atrial fibrillation. / Hesselkilde, Eva Zander; Carstensen, Helena; Flethøj, Mette; Fenner, Merle; Kruse, Ditte Dybvald; Sattler, Stefan M; Tfelt-Hansen, Jacob; Pehrson, Steen; Braunstein, Thomas Hartig; Carlson, Jonas; Platonov, Pyotr G; Jespersen, Thomas; Buhl, Rikke.

I: BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, Bind 19, Nr. 1, 228, 2019.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Hesselkilde, EZ, Carstensen, H, Flethøj, M, Fenner, M, Kruse, DD, Sattler, SM, Tfelt-Hansen, J, Pehrson, S, Braunstein, TH, Carlson, J, Platonov, PG, Jespersen, T & Buhl, R 2019, 'Longitudinal study of electrical, functional and structural remodelling in an equine model of atrial fibrillation', BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, bind 19, nr. 1, 228. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12872-019-1210-4

APA

Hesselkilde, E. Z., Carstensen, H., Flethøj, M., Fenner, M., Kruse, D. D., Sattler, S. M., ... Buhl, R. (2019). Longitudinal study of electrical, functional and structural remodelling in an equine model of atrial fibrillation. BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, 19(1), [228]. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12872-019-1210-4

Vancouver

Hesselkilde EZ, Carstensen H, Flethøj M, Fenner M, Kruse DD, Sattler SM o.a. Longitudinal study of electrical, functional and structural remodelling in an equine model of atrial fibrillation. BMC Cardiovascular Disorders. 2019;19(1). 228. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12872-019-1210-4

Author

Hesselkilde, Eva Zander ; Carstensen, Helena ; Flethøj, Mette ; Fenner, Merle ; Kruse, Ditte Dybvald ; Sattler, Stefan M ; Tfelt-Hansen, Jacob ; Pehrson, Steen ; Braunstein, Thomas Hartig ; Carlson, Jonas ; Platonov, Pyotr G ; Jespersen, Thomas ; Buhl, Rikke. / Longitudinal study of electrical, functional and structural remodelling in an equine model of atrial fibrillation. I: BMC Cardiovascular Disorders. 2019 ; Bind 19, Nr. 1.

Bibtex

@article{5c7c1d1e67e343e1a3853d0d499d2cfb,
title = "Longitudinal study of electrical, functional and structural remodelling in an equine model of atrial fibrillation",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Large animal models are important in atrial fibrillation (AF) research, as they can be used to study the pathophysiology of AF and new therapeutic approaches. Unlike other animal models, horses spontaneously develop AF and could therefore serve as a bona fide model in AF research. We therefore aimed to study the electrical, functional and structural remodelling caused by chronic AF in a horse model.METHOD: Nine female horses were included in the study, with six horses tachypaced into self-sustained AF and three that served as a time-matched sham-operated control group. Acceleration in atrial fibrillatory rate (AFR), changes in electrocardiographic and echocardiographic variables and response to medical treatment (flecainide 2 mg/kg) were recorded over a period of 2 months. At the end of the study, changes in ion channel expression and fibrosis were measured and compared between the two groups.RESULTS: AFR increased from 299 ± 33 fibrillations per minute (fpm) to 376 ± 12 fpm (p < 0.05) and atrial function (active left atrial fractional area change) decreased significantly during the study (p < 0.05). No changes were observed in heart rate or ventricular function. The AF group had more atrial fibrosis compared to the control group (p < 0.05). No differences in ion channel expression were observed.CONCLUSION: Horses with induced AF show signs of atrial remodelling that are similar to humans and other animal models.",
author = "Hesselkilde, {Eva Zander} and Helena Carstensen and Mette Fleth{\o}j and Merle Fenner and Kruse, {Ditte Dybvald} and Sattler, {Stefan M} and Jacob Tfelt-Hansen and Steen Pehrson and Braunstein, {Thomas Hartig} and Jonas Carlson and Platonov, {Pyotr G} and Thomas Jespersen and Rikke Buhl",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1186/s12872-019-1210-4",
language = "English",
volume = "19",
journal = "B M C Cardiovascular Disorders",
issn = "1471-2261",
publisher = "BioMed Central Ltd.",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Longitudinal study of electrical, functional and structural remodelling in an equine model of atrial fibrillation

AU - Hesselkilde, Eva Zander

AU - Carstensen, Helena

AU - Flethøj, Mette

AU - Fenner, Merle

AU - Kruse, Ditte Dybvald

AU - Sattler, Stefan M

AU - Tfelt-Hansen, Jacob

AU - Pehrson, Steen

AU - Braunstein, Thomas Hartig

AU - Carlson, Jonas

AU - Platonov, Pyotr G

AU - Jespersen, Thomas

AU - Buhl, Rikke

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - BACKGROUND: Large animal models are important in atrial fibrillation (AF) research, as they can be used to study the pathophysiology of AF and new therapeutic approaches. Unlike other animal models, horses spontaneously develop AF and could therefore serve as a bona fide model in AF research. We therefore aimed to study the electrical, functional and structural remodelling caused by chronic AF in a horse model.METHOD: Nine female horses were included in the study, with six horses tachypaced into self-sustained AF and three that served as a time-matched sham-operated control group. Acceleration in atrial fibrillatory rate (AFR), changes in electrocardiographic and echocardiographic variables and response to medical treatment (flecainide 2 mg/kg) were recorded over a period of 2 months. At the end of the study, changes in ion channel expression and fibrosis were measured and compared between the two groups.RESULTS: AFR increased from 299 ± 33 fibrillations per minute (fpm) to 376 ± 12 fpm (p < 0.05) and atrial function (active left atrial fractional area change) decreased significantly during the study (p < 0.05). No changes were observed in heart rate or ventricular function. The AF group had more atrial fibrosis compared to the control group (p < 0.05). No differences in ion channel expression were observed.CONCLUSION: Horses with induced AF show signs of atrial remodelling that are similar to humans and other animal models.

AB - BACKGROUND: Large animal models are important in atrial fibrillation (AF) research, as they can be used to study the pathophysiology of AF and new therapeutic approaches. Unlike other animal models, horses spontaneously develop AF and could therefore serve as a bona fide model in AF research. We therefore aimed to study the electrical, functional and structural remodelling caused by chronic AF in a horse model.METHOD: Nine female horses were included in the study, with six horses tachypaced into self-sustained AF and three that served as a time-matched sham-operated control group. Acceleration in atrial fibrillatory rate (AFR), changes in electrocardiographic and echocardiographic variables and response to medical treatment (flecainide 2 mg/kg) were recorded over a period of 2 months. At the end of the study, changes in ion channel expression and fibrosis were measured and compared between the two groups.RESULTS: AFR increased from 299 ± 33 fibrillations per minute (fpm) to 376 ± 12 fpm (p < 0.05) and atrial function (active left atrial fractional area change) decreased significantly during the study (p < 0.05). No changes were observed in heart rate or ventricular function. The AF group had more atrial fibrosis compared to the control group (p < 0.05). No differences in ion channel expression were observed.CONCLUSION: Horses with induced AF show signs of atrial remodelling that are similar to humans and other animal models.

U2 - 10.1186/s12872-019-1210-4

DO - 10.1186/s12872-019-1210-4

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 31638896

VL - 19

JO - B M C Cardiovascular Disorders

JF - B M C Cardiovascular Disorders

SN - 1471-2261

IS - 1

M1 - 228

ER -

ID: 229071524