Do emotion regulation, attentional control, and attachment style predict response to cognitive behavioral therapy for anxiety disorders? – an investigation in clinical settings

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Standard

Do emotion regulation, attentional control, and attachment style predict response to cognitive behavioral therapy for anxiety disorders? – an investigation in clinical settings. / Nielsen, Sara Kerstine Kaya; Pedersen, Ida Hageman; Petersen, Anders; Daniel, Sarah Ingrid Franksdatter; Lau, Marianne; Winding, Clas; Wolitzky-Taylor, Kate B.; Steele, Howard; Vangkilde, Signe.

I: Psychotherapy Research, Bind 49, Nr. 8, 2019, s. 999-1009.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Nielsen, SKK, Pedersen, IH, Petersen, A, Daniel, SIF, Lau, M, Winding, C, Wolitzky-Taylor, KB, Steele, H & Vangkilde, S 2019, 'Do emotion regulation, attentional control, and attachment style predict response to cognitive behavioral therapy for anxiety disorders? – an investigation in clinical settings', Psychotherapy Research, bind 49, nr. 8, s. 999-1009. https://doi.org/10.1080/10503307.2018.1425933

APA

Nielsen, S. K. K., Pedersen, I. H., Petersen, A., Daniel, S. I. F., Lau, M., Winding, C., ... Vangkilde, S. (2019). Do emotion regulation, attentional control, and attachment style predict response to cognitive behavioral therapy for anxiety disorders? – an investigation in clinical settings. Psychotherapy Research, 49(8), 999-1009. https://doi.org/10.1080/10503307.2018.1425933

Vancouver

Nielsen SKK, Pedersen IH, Petersen A, Daniel SIF, Lau M, Winding C o.a. Do emotion regulation, attentional control, and attachment style predict response to cognitive behavioral therapy for anxiety disorders? – an investigation in clinical settings. Psychotherapy Research. 2019;49(8):999-1009. https://doi.org/10.1080/10503307.2018.1425933

Author

Nielsen, Sara Kerstine Kaya ; Pedersen, Ida Hageman ; Petersen, Anders ; Daniel, Sarah Ingrid Franksdatter ; Lau, Marianne ; Winding, Clas ; Wolitzky-Taylor, Kate B. ; Steele, Howard ; Vangkilde, Signe. / Do emotion regulation, attentional control, and attachment style predict response to cognitive behavioral therapy for anxiety disorders? – an investigation in clinical settings. I: Psychotherapy Research. 2019 ; Bind 49, Nr. 8. s. 999-1009.

Bibtex

@article{345c325bdc564656b7ec012744f316b2,
title = "Do emotion regulation, attentional control, and attachment style predict response to cognitive behavioral therapy for anxiety disorders? – an investigation in clinical settings",
abstract = "Objective: Approximately, 50{\%} of all individuals with anxiety disorders do not benefit from the “gold standard” treatment, namely cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Reliable predictors of treatment effect are lacking. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the predictive value of emotion regulation, attentional control, and attachment style for group-based CBT outcomes in routine clinical settings. Method: A total of 76 patients with anxiety disorders received manual-based group CBT at psychiatric outpatient clinics. Emotion regulation, attachment style, and attentional control were assessed with self-report measures and with an experimental computer-based attentional control task at baseline. The severity of anxiety was assessed at intake, post-treatment, and at a 6-month follow-up. Results: Attentional control, emotion regulation, and attachment avoidance did not predict treatment outcomes. Higher attachment anxiety at baseline was significantly related to poorer outcome. Conclusion: In routine clinical settings, high attachment anxiety may predict poorer outcomes for group-based CBT.",
keywords = "anxiety disorders, attachment, attentional control, cognitive behavioral therapy, emotion regulation, predictors",
author = "Nielsen, {Sara Kerstine Kaya} and Pedersen, {Ida Hageman} and Anders Petersen and Daniel, {Sarah Ingrid Franksdatter} and Marianne Lau and Clas Winding and Wolitzky-Taylor, {Kate B.} and Howard Steele and Signe Vangkilde",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1080/10503307.2018.1425933",
language = "English",
volume = "49",
pages = "999--1009",
journal = "Psychotherapy Research",
issn = "1050-3307",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "8",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Do emotion regulation, attentional control, and attachment style predict response to cognitive behavioral therapy for anxiety disorders? – an investigation in clinical settings

AU - Nielsen, Sara Kerstine Kaya

AU - Pedersen, Ida Hageman

AU - Petersen, Anders

AU - Daniel, Sarah Ingrid Franksdatter

AU - Lau, Marianne

AU - Winding, Clas

AU - Wolitzky-Taylor, Kate B.

AU - Steele, Howard

AU - Vangkilde, Signe

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Objective: Approximately, 50% of all individuals with anxiety disorders do not benefit from the “gold standard” treatment, namely cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Reliable predictors of treatment effect are lacking. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the predictive value of emotion regulation, attentional control, and attachment style for group-based CBT outcomes in routine clinical settings. Method: A total of 76 patients with anxiety disorders received manual-based group CBT at psychiatric outpatient clinics. Emotion regulation, attachment style, and attentional control were assessed with self-report measures and with an experimental computer-based attentional control task at baseline. The severity of anxiety was assessed at intake, post-treatment, and at a 6-month follow-up. Results: Attentional control, emotion regulation, and attachment avoidance did not predict treatment outcomes. Higher attachment anxiety at baseline was significantly related to poorer outcome. Conclusion: In routine clinical settings, high attachment anxiety may predict poorer outcomes for group-based CBT.

AB - Objective: Approximately, 50% of all individuals with anxiety disorders do not benefit from the “gold standard” treatment, namely cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Reliable predictors of treatment effect are lacking. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the predictive value of emotion regulation, attentional control, and attachment style for group-based CBT outcomes in routine clinical settings. Method: A total of 76 patients with anxiety disorders received manual-based group CBT at psychiatric outpatient clinics. Emotion regulation, attachment style, and attentional control were assessed with self-report measures and with an experimental computer-based attentional control task at baseline. The severity of anxiety was assessed at intake, post-treatment, and at a 6-month follow-up. Results: Attentional control, emotion regulation, and attachment avoidance did not predict treatment outcomes. Higher attachment anxiety at baseline was significantly related to poorer outcome. Conclusion: In routine clinical settings, high attachment anxiety may predict poorer outcomes for group-based CBT.

KW - anxiety disorders

KW - attachment

KW - attentional control

KW - cognitive behavioral therapy

KW - emotion regulation

KW - predictors

U2 - 10.1080/10503307.2018.1425933

DO - 10.1080/10503307.2018.1425933

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 29357764

VL - 49

SP - 999

EP - 1009

JO - Psychotherapy Research

JF - Psychotherapy Research

SN - 1050-3307

IS - 8

ER -

ID: 188693363