Distribution of concurrent training sessions does not impact endurance adaptation

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Standard

Distribution of concurrent training sessions does not impact endurance adaptation. / Kilen, Anders; Bay, Jonathan; Bejder, Jacob; Breenfeldt Andersen, Andreas; Bonne, Thomas; Larsen, Pernille; Carlsen, Andreas; Egelund, Jon; Nybo, Lars; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal; Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob; Løvind Andersen, Jesper; Nordsborg, Nikolai Baastrup.

I: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Bind 24, Nr. 3, 2021, s. 291-296.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Kilen, A, Bay, J, Bejder, J, Breenfeldt Andersen, A, Bonne, T, Larsen, P, Carlsen, A, Egelund, J, Nybo, L, Olsen, NV, Aachmann-Andersen, NJ, Løvind Andersen, J & Nordsborg, NB 2021, 'Distribution of concurrent training sessions does not impact endurance adaptation', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, bind 24, nr. 3, s. 291-296. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsams.2020.09.009

APA

Kilen, A., Bay, J., Bejder, J., Breenfeldt Andersen, A., Bonne, T., Larsen, P., ... Nordsborg, N. B. (2021). Distribution of concurrent training sessions does not impact endurance adaptation. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 24(3), 291-296. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsams.2020.09.009

Vancouver

Kilen A, Bay J, Bejder J, Breenfeldt Andersen A, Bonne T, Larsen P o.a. Distribution of concurrent training sessions does not impact endurance adaptation. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport. 2021;24(3):291-296. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsams.2020.09.009

Author

Kilen, Anders ; Bay, Jonathan ; Bejder, Jacob ; Breenfeldt Andersen, Andreas ; Bonne, Thomas ; Larsen, Pernille ; Carlsen, Andreas ; Egelund, Jon ; Nybo, Lars ; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal ; Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob ; Løvind Andersen, Jesper ; Nordsborg, Nikolai Baastrup. / Distribution of concurrent training sessions does not impact endurance adaptation. I: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport. 2021 ; Bind 24, Nr. 3. s. 291-296.

Bibtex

@article{92038661d475489daa1b956342e364d4,
title = "Distribution of concurrent training sessions does not impact endurance adaptation",
abstract = "Objectives: Optimized concurrent training regimes are warranted in physical training of military-, law enforcement- and rescue-personnel. This study investigated if four 15-min endurance training sessions weekly improve aerobic capacity and performance more than one 60-min endurance session weekly during the initial phase of a Basic Military Training program.Design: A randomized training intervention study with functional and physiological tests before and after the intervention.Methods: Military conscripts (n=290) were randomly allocated to three groups completing 9 weeks training. Weekly training consisted of four endurance and four strength training sessions lasting 15min each ('Micro-training': MIC); one strength and one endurance session lasting 60min each ('Classical-training': CLA) or two 60min sessions of standard military training ('Control-training': CON).Results: Both 12-min (∼7-10{\%}) and shuttle run performance (∼35-42{\%}) improved (P≤0.001) similarly in all groups. Likewise, functional 2-min maximal repetition exercise capacity increased (P≤0.05) similarly in all groups (Lunges ∼17-24 {\%}; PushUp ∼10-20{\%}; AbdominalFlexions∼21-23{\%}). Peak oxygen uptake changes depended on group (P≤0.05) with increases (P≤0.01) in MIC (7±7{\%}, n=23) and CON (12±18{\%}, n=17) and no changes in CLA. Maximal m. vastus lateralis citrate synthase activity decreased 14±26{\%} (P≤0.001, n=18) in CLA. Likewise, maximal m. vastus lateralis 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity decreased 8±17{\%} in MIC (n=28) and 14±24{\%} in CLA (n=18).Conclusions: Four 15-min endurance training sessions weekly improves running performance and strength-endurance similarly to one 60min session. Peak oxygen uptake only increases with more than one endurance session weekly and leg muscle oxidative capacity appears reduced after basic military training.",
keywords = "Faculty of Science, Low volume training, Training distribution, Capillaries, Metabolic enzyme activity, Military",
author = "Anders Kilen and Jonathan Bay and Jacob Bejder and {Breenfeldt Andersen}, Andreas and Thomas Bonne and Pernille Larsen and Andreas Carlsen and Jon Egelund and Lars Nybo and Olsen, {Niels Vidiendal} and Aachmann-Andersen, {Niels Jacob} and {L{\o}vind Andersen}, Jesper and Nordsborg, {Nikolai Baastrup}",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2020 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.",
year = "2021",
doi = "10.1016/j.jsams.2020.09.009",
language = "English",
volume = "24",
pages = "291--296",
journal = "Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport",
issn = "1440-2440",
publisher = "Elsevier Australia",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Distribution of concurrent training sessions does not impact endurance adaptation

AU - Kilen, Anders

AU - Bay, Jonathan

AU - Bejder, Jacob

AU - Breenfeldt Andersen, Andreas

AU - Bonne, Thomas

AU - Larsen, Pernille

AU - Carlsen, Andreas

AU - Egelund, Jon

AU - Nybo, Lars

AU - Olsen, Niels Vidiendal

AU - Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob

AU - Løvind Andersen, Jesper

AU - Nordsborg, Nikolai Baastrup

N1 - Copyright © 2020 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PY - 2021

Y1 - 2021

N2 - Objectives: Optimized concurrent training regimes are warranted in physical training of military-, law enforcement- and rescue-personnel. This study investigated if four 15-min endurance training sessions weekly improve aerobic capacity and performance more than one 60-min endurance session weekly during the initial phase of a Basic Military Training program.Design: A randomized training intervention study with functional and physiological tests before and after the intervention.Methods: Military conscripts (n=290) were randomly allocated to three groups completing 9 weeks training. Weekly training consisted of four endurance and four strength training sessions lasting 15min each ('Micro-training': MIC); one strength and one endurance session lasting 60min each ('Classical-training': CLA) or two 60min sessions of standard military training ('Control-training': CON).Results: Both 12-min (∼7-10%) and shuttle run performance (∼35-42%) improved (P≤0.001) similarly in all groups. Likewise, functional 2-min maximal repetition exercise capacity increased (P≤0.05) similarly in all groups (Lunges ∼17-24 %; PushUp ∼10-20%; AbdominalFlexions∼21-23%). Peak oxygen uptake changes depended on group (P≤0.05) with increases (P≤0.01) in MIC (7±7%, n=23) and CON (12±18%, n=17) and no changes in CLA. Maximal m. vastus lateralis citrate synthase activity decreased 14±26% (P≤0.001, n=18) in CLA. Likewise, maximal m. vastus lateralis 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity decreased 8±17% in MIC (n=28) and 14±24% in CLA (n=18).Conclusions: Four 15-min endurance training sessions weekly improves running performance and strength-endurance similarly to one 60min session. Peak oxygen uptake only increases with more than one endurance session weekly and leg muscle oxidative capacity appears reduced after basic military training.

AB - Objectives: Optimized concurrent training regimes are warranted in physical training of military-, law enforcement- and rescue-personnel. This study investigated if four 15-min endurance training sessions weekly improve aerobic capacity and performance more than one 60-min endurance session weekly during the initial phase of a Basic Military Training program.Design: A randomized training intervention study with functional and physiological tests before and after the intervention.Methods: Military conscripts (n=290) were randomly allocated to three groups completing 9 weeks training. Weekly training consisted of four endurance and four strength training sessions lasting 15min each ('Micro-training': MIC); one strength and one endurance session lasting 60min each ('Classical-training': CLA) or two 60min sessions of standard military training ('Control-training': CON).Results: Both 12-min (∼7-10%) and shuttle run performance (∼35-42%) improved (P≤0.001) similarly in all groups. Likewise, functional 2-min maximal repetition exercise capacity increased (P≤0.05) similarly in all groups (Lunges ∼17-24 %; PushUp ∼10-20%; AbdominalFlexions∼21-23%). Peak oxygen uptake changes depended on group (P≤0.05) with increases (P≤0.01) in MIC (7±7%, n=23) and CON (12±18%, n=17) and no changes in CLA. Maximal m. vastus lateralis citrate synthase activity decreased 14±26% (P≤0.001, n=18) in CLA. Likewise, maximal m. vastus lateralis 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity decreased 8±17% in MIC (n=28) and 14±24% in CLA (n=18).Conclusions: Four 15-min endurance training sessions weekly improves running performance and strength-endurance similarly to one 60min session. Peak oxygen uptake only increases with more than one endurance session weekly and leg muscle oxidative capacity appears reduced after basic military training.

KW - Faculty of Science

KW - Low volume training

KW - Training distribution

KW - Capillaries

KW - Metabolic enzyme activity

KW - Military

U2 - 10.1016/j.jsams.2020.09.009

DO - 10.1016/j.jsams.2020.09.009

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 32998848

VL - 24

SP - 291

EP - 296

JO - Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport

JF - Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport

SN - 1440-2440

IS - 3

ER -

ID: 249426003