Is high oily fish intake achievable and how does it affect nutrient status in 8-9-year-old children? the FiSK Junior trial

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Is high oily fish intake achievable and how does it affect nutrient status in 8-9-year-old children? the FiSK Junior trial. / Vuholm, Stine; Teisen, Marie Nygaard; Buch, Nanna Glent; Stark, Ken D; Jakobsen, Jette; Mølgaard, Christian; Lauritzen, Lotte; Damsgaard, Camilla Trab.

I: European Journal of Nutrition, 09.05.2019.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Vuholm, S, Teisen, MN, Buch, NG, Stark, KD, Jakobsen, J, Mølgaard, C, Lauritzen, L & Damsgaard, CT 2019, 'Is high oily fish intake achievable and how does it affect nutrient status in 8-9-year-old children? the FiSK Junior trial', European Journal of Nutrition. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00394-019-01981-y

APA

Vuholm, S., Teisen, M. N., Buch, N. G., Stark, K. D., Jakobsen, J., Mølgaard, C., ... Damsgaard, C. T. (2019). Is high oily fish intake achievable and how does it affect nutrient status in 8-9-year-old children? the FiSK Junior trial. European Journal of Nutrition. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00394-019-01981-y

Vancouver

Vuholm S, Teisen MN, Buch NG, Stark KD, Jakobsen J, Mølgaard C o.a. Is high oily fish intake achievable and how does it affect nutrient status in 8-9-year-old children? the FiSK Junior trial. European Journal of Nutrition. 2019 maj 9. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00394-019-01981-y

Author

Vuholm, Stine ; Teisen, Marie Nygaard ; Buch, Nanna Glent ; Stark, Ken D ; Jakobsen, Jette ; Mølgaard, Christian ; Lauritzen, Lotte ; Damsgaard, Camilla Trab. / Is high oily fish intake achievable and how does it affect nutrient status in 8-9-year-old children? the FiSK Junior trial. I: European Journal of Nutrition. 2019.

Bibtex

@article{30b363feb9f540dfba753d9b3c47124b,
title = "Is high oily fish intake achievable and how does it affect nutrient status in 8-9-year-old children?: the FiSK Junior trial",
abstract = "Purpose: Most children do not meet dietary guidelines for fish intake. Fish is the main source of EPA (20:5n-3), DHA (22:6n-3) and vitamin D, but may replace better iron sources such as meat. We investigated if intake of 300 g/week oily fish was achievable in children and how it affected their nutrient status. Additionally, we validated a fish food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) by correlations against EPA + DHA in red blood cells (RBC).Methods: In a randomised 12-week trial, 199 children (8-9 years) received oily fish or poultry (control) to be eaten five times/week. We measured dietary intake and analysed fasting RBC EPA + DHA, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), blood haemoglobin and plasma ferritin.Results: 197 (99{\%}) children completed the study. The median (25th-75th percentile) intake was 375 (325-426) and 400 (359-452) g/week oily fish and poultry, respectively. The fish group increased their intake of EPA + DHA by 749 (593-891) mg/day and vitamin D by 3.1 (1.6-3.8) µg/day. Endpoint RBC EPA + DHA was 2.3 (95{\%} CI 1.9; 2.6) fatty acid {\%}-point higher than the poultry group (P < 0.001). The fish group avoided the expected 25(OH)D winter decline (P < 0.001) and had 23{\%}-point less vitamin D insufficiency (winter subgroup, n = 82). Haemoglobin and ferritin decreased slightly in both groups (P < 0.05), but the number of children with low values did not change (P > 0.14). FFQ estimates moderately reflected habitual intake (r = 0.28-0.35) and sufficiently captured intervention-introduced changes in intake (r > 0.65).Conclusion: Oily fish intake of 300 g/week was achievable and improved children's EPA + DHA and 25(OH)D status, without markedly compromising iron status. These results justify public health initiatives focusing on children's fish intake.",
keywords = "Faculty of Science, Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), Vitamin D, Iron, n-3 Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LCPUFA)",
author = "Stine Vuholm and Teisen, {Marie Nygaard} and Buch, {Nanna Glent} and Stark, {Ken D} and Jette Jakobsen and Christian M{\o}lgaard and Lotte Lauritzen and Damsgaard, {Camilla Trab}",
note = "CURIS 2019 NEXS 160",
year = "2019",
month = "5",
day = "9",
doi = "10.1007/s00394-019-01981-y",
language = "English",
journal = "European Journal of Nutrition",
issn = "1436-6207",
publisher = "Springer Medizin",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Is high oily fish intake achievable and how does it affect nutrient status in 8-9-year-old children?

T2 - the FiSK Junior trial

AU - Vuholm, Stine

AU - Teisen, Marie Nygaard

AU - Buch, Nanna Glent

AU - Stark, Ken D

AU - Jakobsen, Jette

AU - Mølgaard, Christian

AU - Lauritzen, Lotte

AU - Damsgaard, Camilla Trab

N1 - CURIS 2019 NEXS 160

PY - 2019/5/9

Y1 - 2019/5/9

N2 - Purpose: Most children do not meet dietary guidelines for fish intake. Fish is the main source of EPA (20:5n-3), DHA (22:6n-3) and vitamin D, but may replace better iron sources such as meat. We investigated if intake of 300 g/week oily fish was achievable in children and how it affected their nutrient status. Additionally, we validated a fish food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) by correlations against EPA + DHA in red blood cells (RBC).Methods: In a randomised 12-week trial, 199 children (8-9 years) received oily fish or poultry (control) to be eaten five times/week. We measured dietary intake and analysed fasting RBC EPA + DHA, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), blood haemoglobin and plasma ferritin.Results: 197 (99%) children completed the study. The median (25th-75th percentile) intake was 375 (325-426) and 400 (359-452) g/week oily fish and poultry, respectively. The fish group increased their intake of EPA + DHA by 749 (593-891) mg/day and vitamin D by 3.1 (1.6-3.8) µg/day. Endpoint RBC EPA + DHA was 2.3 (95% CI 1.9; 2.6) fatty acid %-point higher than the poultry group (P < 0.001). The fish group avoided the expected 25(OH)D winter decline (P < 0.001) and had 23%-point less vitamin D insufficiency (winter subgroup, n = 82). Haemoglobin and ferritin decreased slightly in both groups (P < 0.05), but the number of children with low values did not change (P > 0.14). FFQ estimates moderately reflected habitual intake (r = 0.28-0.35) and sufficiently captured intervention-introduced changes in intake (r > 0.65).Conclusion: Oily fish intake of 300 g/week was achievable and improved children's EPA + DHA and 25(OH)D status, without markedly compromising iron status. These results justify public health initiatives focusing on children's fish intake.

AB - Purpose: Most children do not meet dietary guidelines for fish intake. Fish is the main source of EPA (20:5n-3), DHA (22:6n-3) and vitamin D, but may replace better iron sources such as meat. We investigated if intake of 300 g/week oily fish was achievable in children and how it affected their nutrient status. Additionally, we validated a fish food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) by correlations against EPA + DHA in red blood cells (RBC).Methods: In a randomised 12-week trial, 199 children (8-9 years) received oily fish or poultry (control) to be eaten five times/week. We measured dietary intake and analysed fasting RBC EPA + DHA, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), blood haemoglobin and plasma ferritin.Results: 197 (99%) children completed the study. The median (25th-75th percentile) intake was 375 (325-426) and 400 (359-452) g/week oily fish and poultry, respectively. The fish group increased their intake of EPA + DHA by 749 (593-891) mg/day and vitamin D by 3.1 (1.6-3.8) µg/day. Endpoint RBC EPA + DHA was 2.3 (95% CI 1.9; 2.6) fatty acid %-point higher than the poultry group (P < 0.001). The fish group avoided the expected 25(OH)D winter decline (P < 0.001) and had 23%-point less vitamin D insufficiency (winter subgroup, n = 82). Haemoglobin and ferritin decreased slightly in both groups (P < 0.05), but the number of children with low values did not change (P > 0.14). FFQ estimates moderately reflected habitual intake (r = 0.28-0.35) and sufficiently captured intervention-introduced changes in intake (r > 0.65).Conclusion: Oily fish intake of 300 g/week was achievable and improved children's EPA + DHA and 25(OH)D status, without markedly compromising iron status. These results justify public health initiatives focusing on children's fish intake.

KW - Faculty of Science

KW - Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)

KW - Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)

KW - Vitamin D

KW - Iron

KW - n-3 Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LCPUFA)

U2 - 10.1007/s00394-019-01981-y

DO - 10.1007/s00394-019-01981-y

M3 - Journal article

JO - European Journal of Nutrition

JF - European Journal of Nutrition

SN - 1436-6207

ER -

ID: 217934244