The metastasis-promoting S100A4 protein confers neuroprotection in brain injury

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Standard

The metastasis-promoting S100A4 protein confers neuroprotection in brain injury. / Dmytriyeva, Oksana; Pankratova, Stanislava; Owczarek, Sylwia; Sonn, Katrin; Soroka, Vladislav; Ridley, Christina M; Marsolais, Alexander; Lopez-Hoyos, Marcos; Ambartsumian, Noona; Lukanidin, Eugene; Bock, Elisabeth; Berezin, Vladimir; Kiryushko, Dar'Ya.

I: Nature Communications, Bind 3, Nr. 1197, 13.11.2012, s. 1197.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Dmytriyeva, O, Pankratova, S, Owczarek, S, Sonn, K, Soroka, V, Ridley, CM, Marsolais, A, Lopez-Hoyos, M, Ambartsumian, N, Lukanidin, E, Bock, E, Berezin, V & Kiryushko, DY 2012, 'The metastasis-promoting S100A4 protein confers neuroprotection in brain injury' Nature Communications, bind 3, nr. 1197, s. 1197. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms2202

APA

Dmytriyeva, O., Pankratova, S., Owczarek, S., Sonn, K., Soroka, V., Ridley, C. M., ... Kiryushko, DY. (2012). The metastasis-promoting S100A4 protein confers neuroprotection in brain injury. Nature Communications, 3(1197), 1197. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms2202

Vancouver

Dmytriyeva O, Pankratova S, Owczarek S, Sonn K, Soroka V, Ridley CM o.a. The metastasis-promoting S100A4 protein confers neuroprotection in brain injury. Nature Communications. 2012 nov 13;3(1197):1197. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms2202

Author

Dmytriyeva, Oksana ; Pankratova, Stanislava ; Owczarek, Sylwia ; Sonn, Katrin ; Soroka, Vladislav ; Ridley, Christina M ; Marsolais, Alexander ; Lopez-Hoyos, Marcos ; Ambartsumian, Noona ; Lukanidin, Eugene ; Bock, Elisabeth ; Berezin, Vladimir ; Kiryushko, Dar'Ya. / The metastasis-promoting S100A4 protein confers neuroprotection in brain injury. I: Nature Communications. 2012 ; Bind 3, Nr. 1197. s. 1197.

Bibtex

@article{54c95af58d0848fbb5b1f8e4c96c3c63,
title = "The metastasis-promoting S100A4 protein confers neuroprotection in brain injury",
abstract = "Identification of novel pro-survival factors in the brain is paramount for developing neuroprotective therapies. The multifunctional S100 family proteins have important roles in many human diseases and are also upregulated by brain injury. However, S100 functions in the nervous system remain unclear. Here we show that the S100A4 protein, mostly studied in cancer, is overexpressed in the damaged human and rodent brain and released from stressed astrocytes. Genetic deletion of S100A4 exacerbates neuronal loss after brain trauma or excitotoxicity, increasing oxidative cell damage and downregulating the neuroprotective protein metallothionein I+II. We identify two neurotrophic motifs in S100A4 and show that these motifs are neuroprotective in animal models of brain trauma. Finally, we find that S100A4 rescues neurons via the Janus kinase/STAT pathway and, partially, the interleukin-10 receptor. Our data introduce S100A4 as a therapeutic target in neurodegeneration, and raise the entire S100 family as a potentially important factor in central nervous system injury.",
keywords = "Amino Acid Motifs, Animals, Brain Injuries, Cell Death, Cytoprotection, Female, Gene Deletion, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Janus Kinases, Kainic Acid, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Neoplasm Metastasis, Neurons, Neuroprotective Agents, Neurotoxins, Oxidative Stress, Peptides, Rats, Receptors, Interleukin-10, S100 Proteins, STAT Transcription Factors, Seizures, Up-Regulation",
author = "Oksana Dmytriyeva and Stanislava Pankratova and Sylwia Owczarek and Katrin Sonn and Vladislav Soroka and Ridley, {Christina M} and Alexander Marsolais and Marcos Lopez-Hoyos and Noona Ambartsumian and Eugene Lukanidin and Elisabeth Bock and Vladimir Berezin and Dar'Ya Kiryushko",
year = "2012",
month = "11",
day = "13",
doi = "10.1038/ncomms2202",
language = "English",
volume = "3",
pages = "1197",
journal = "Nature Communications",
issn = "2041-1723",
publisher = "nature publishing group",
number = "1197",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The metastasis-promoting S100A4 protein confers neuroprotection in brain injury

AU - Dmytriyeva, Oksana

AU - Pankratova, Stanislava

AU - Owczarek, Sylwia

AU - Sonn, Katrin

AU - Soroka, Vladislav

AU - Ridley, Christina M

AU - Marsolais, Alexander

AU - Lopez-Hoyos, Marcos

AU - Ambartsumian, Noona

AU - Lukanidin, Eugene

AU - Bock, Elisabeth

AU - Berezin, Vladimir

AU - Kiryushko, Dar'Ya

PY - 2012/11/13

Y1 - 2012/11/13

N2 - Identification of novel pro-survival factors in the brain is paramount for developing neuroprotective therapies. The multifunctional S100 family proteins have important roles in many human diseases and are also upregulated by brain injury. However, S100 functions in the nervous system remain unclear. Here we show that the S100A4 protein, mostly studied in cancer, is overexpressed in the damaged human and rodent brain and released from stressed astrocytes. Genetic deletion of S100A4 exacerbates neuronal loss after brain trauma or excitotoxicity, increasing oxidative cell damage and downregulating the neuroprotective protein metallothionein I+II. We identify two neurotrophic motifs in S100A4 and show that these motifs are neuroprotective in animal models of brain trauma. Finally, we find that S100A4 rescues neurons via the Janus kinase/STAT pathway and, partially, the interleukin-10 receptor. Our data introduce S100A4 as a therapeutic target in neurodegeneration, and raise the entire S100 family as a potentially important factor in central nervous system injury.

AB - Identification of novel pro-survival factors in the brain is paramount for developing neuroprotective therapies. The multifunctional S100 family proteins have important roles in many human diseases and are also upregulated by brain injury. However, S100 functions in the nervous system remain unclear. Here we show that the S100A4 protein, mostly studied in cancer, is overexpressed in the damaged human and rodent brain and released from stressed astrocytes. Genetic deletion of S100A4 exacerbates neuronal loss after brain trauma or excitotoxicity, increasing oxidative cell damage and downregulating the neuroprotective protein metallothionein I+II. We identify two neurotrophic motifs in S100A4 and show that these motifs are neuroprotective in animal models of brain trauma. Finally, we find that S100A4 rescues neurons via the Janus kinase/STAT pathway and, partially, the interleukin-10 receptor. Our data introduce S100A4 as a therapeutic target in neurodegeneration, and raise the entire S100 family as a potentially important factor in central nervous system injury.

KW - Amino Acid Motifs

KW - Animals

KW - Brain Injuries

KW - Cell Death

KW - Cytoprotection

KW - Female

KW - Gene Deletion

KW - HEK293 Cells

KW - Humans

KW - Janus Kinases

KW - Kainic Acid

KW - Mice

KW - Mice, Inbred C57BL

KW - Neoplasm Metastasis

KW - Neurons

KW - Neuroprotective Agents

KW - Neurotoxins

KW - Oxidative Stress

KW - Peptides

KW - Rats

KW - Receptors, Interleukin-10

KW - S100 Proteins

KW - STAT Transcription Factors

KW - Seizures

KW - Up-Regulation

U2 - 10.1038/ncomms2202

DO - 10.1038/ncomms2202

M3 - Journal article

VL - 3

SP - 1197

JO - Nature Communications

JF - Nature Communications

SN - 2041-1723

IS - 1197

ER -

ID: 45118515