Bulk characterization of pharmaceutical powders by low-pressure compression II: effect of method settings and particle size

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Standard

Bulk characterization of pharmaceutical powders by low-pressure compression II : effect of method settings and particle size. / Hagsten Sørensen, A.; Sonnergaard, Jørn; Hovgaard, L.

I: Pharmaceutical Development and Technology, Bind 11, Nr. 2, 01.05.2006, s. 235-241.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Hagsten Sørensen, A, Sonnergaard, J & Hovgaard, L 2006, 'Bulk characterization of pharmaceutical powders by low-pressure compression II: effect of method settings and particle size' Pharmaceutical Development and Technology, bind 11, nr. 2, s. 235-241. https://doi.org/10.1080/10837450600561448

APA

Hagsten Sørensen, A., Sonnergaard, J., & Hovgaard, L. (2006). Bulk characterization of pharmaceutical powders by low-pressure compression II: effect of method settings and particle size. Pharmaceutical Development and Technology, 11(2), 235-241. https://doi.org/10.1080/10837450600561448

Vancouver

Hagsten Sørensen A, Sonnergaard J, Hovgaard L. Bulk characterization of pharmaceutical powders by low-pressure compression II: effect of method settings and particle size. Pharmaceutical Development and Technology. 2006 maj 1;11(2):235-241. https://doi.org/10.1080/10837450600561448

Author

Hagsten Sørensen, A. ; Sonnergaard, Jørn ; Hovgaard, L. / Bulk characterization of pharmaceutical powders by low-pressure compression II : effect of method settings and particle size. I: Pharmaceutical Development and Technology. 2006 ; Bind 11, Nr. 2. s. 235-241.

Bibtex

@article{6435cca0596c406bbc9e56101f384655,
title = "Bulk characterization of pharmaceutical powders by low-pressure compression II: effect of method settings and particle size",
abstract = "The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of punch and die diameter, sample size, compression speed, and particle size on two low-pressure compression-derived parameters; the compressed density and the Walker w parameter. The excellent repeatability of the low-pressure compression method allowed small effects of variations in punch and die diameter and sample size to be demonstrated on a high significance level. Changing the compression speed, however, did not cause a significant effect in the compressed density, whereas a decrease in w was seen. The effect of particle size was studied by compressing and tapping different grades of calcium carbonate, lactose, and microcrystalline cellulose. The low-pressure compression-derived parameters were compared to tapped densities and to Compressibility Indexes obtained by tapping volumetry. Even though the relationship between particle size and the low-pressure compression-derived parameters appeared to be more complicated, a similar trend was observed. It was concluded that the low-pressure compression method provides a useful alternative to the more sample-consuming methods providing flow-related information.",
author = "{Hagsten S{\o}rensen}, A. and J{\o}rn Sonnergaard and L. Hovgaard",
year = "2006",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/10837450600561448",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
pages = "235--241",
journal = "Pharmaceutical Development and Technology",
issn = "1083-7450",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Bulk characterization of pharmaceutical powders by low-pressure compression II

T2 - effect of method settings and particle size

AU - Hagsten Sørensen, A.

AU - Sonnergaard, Jørn

AU - Hovgaard, L.

PY - 2006/5/1

Y1 - 2006/5/1

N2 - The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of punch and die diameter, sample size, compression speed, and particle size on two low-pressure compression-derived parameters; the compressed density and the Walker w parameter. The excellent repeatability of the low-pressure compression method allowed small effects of variations in punch and die diameter and sample size to be demonstrated on a high significance level. Changing the compression speed, however, did not cause a significant effect in the compressed density, whereas a decrease in w was seen. The effect of particle size was studied by compressing and tapping different grades of calcium carbonate, lactose, and microcrystalline cellulose. The low-pressure compression-derived parameters were compared to tapped densities and to Compressibility Indexes obtained by tapping volumetry. Even though the relationship between particle size and the low-pressure compression-derived parameters appeared to be more complicated, a similar trend was observed. It was concluded that the low-pressure compression method provides a useful alternative to the more sample-consuming methods providing flow-related information.

AB - The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of punch and die diameter, sample size, compression speed, and particle size on two low-pressure compression-derived parameters; the compressed density and the Walker w parameter. The excellent repeatability of the low-pressure compression method allowed small effects of variations in punch and die diameter and sample size to be demonstrated on a high significance level. Changing the compression speed, however, did not cause a significant effect in the compressed density, whereas a decrease in w was seen. The effect of particle size was studied by compressing and tapping different grades of calcium carbonate, lactose, and microcrystalline cellulose. The low-pressure compression-derived parameters were compared to tapped densities and to Compressibility Indexes obtained by tapping volumetry. Even though the relationship between particle size and the low-pressure compression-derived parameters appeared to be more complicated, a similar trend was observed. It was concluded that the low-pressure compression method provides a useful alternative to the more sample-consuming methods providing flow-related information.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33745071563&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/10837450600561448

DO - 10.1080/10837450600561448

M3 - Journal article

VL - 11

SP - 235

EP - 241

JO - Pharmaceutical Development and Technology

JF - Pharmaceutical Development and Technology

SN - 1083-7450

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 63007239