Acquisition and decay of antibodies to pregnancy-associated variant antigens on the surface of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes that protect against placental parasitemia

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Standard

Acquisition and decay of antibodies to pregnancy-associated variant antigens on the surface of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes that protect against placental parasitemia. / Staalsoe, T; Megnekou, R; Fievét, N; Ricke, C H; Zornig, H D; Leke, R; Taylor, D W; Deloron, P; Hviid, L.

I: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Bind 184, Nr. 5, 2001, s. 618-26.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Staalsoe, T, Megnekou, R, Fievét, N, Ricke, CH, Zornig, HD, Leke, R, Taylor, DW, Deloron, P & Hviid, L 2001, 'Acquisition and decay of antibodies to pregnancy-associated variant antigens on the surface of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes that protect against placental parasitemia', Journal of Infectious Diseases, bind 184, nr. 5, s. 618-26. https://doi.org/10.1086/322809

APA

Staalsoe, T., Megnekou, R., Fievét, N., Ricke, C. H., Zornig, H. D., Leke, R., ... Hviid, L. (2001). Acquisition and decay of antibodies to pregnancy-associated variant antigens on the surface of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes that protect against placental parasitemia. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 184(5), 618-26. https://doi.org/10.1086/322809

Vancouver

Staalsoe T, Megnekou R, Fievét N, Ricke CH, Zornig HD, Leke R o.a. Acquisition and decay of antibodies to pregnancy-associated variant antigens on the surface of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes that protect against placental parasitemia. Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2001;184(5):618-26. https://doi.org/10.1086/322809

Author

Staalsoe, T ; Megnekou, R ; Fievét, N ; Ricke, C H ; Zornig, H D ; Leke, R ; Taylor, D W ; Deloron, P ; Hviid, L. / Acquisition and decay of antibodies to pregnancy-associated variant antigens on the surface of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes that protect against placental parasitemia. I: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2001 ; Bind 184, Nr. 5. s. 618-26.

Bibtex

@article{66563a50a03911dd86a6000ea68e967b,
title = "Acquisition and decay of antibodies to pregnancy-associated variant antigens on the surface of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes that protect against placental parasitemia",
abstract = "Otherwise clinically immune women in areas endemic for malaria are highly susceptible to Plasmodium falciparum malaria during their first pregnancy. Pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) is characterized by placental accumulation of infected erythrocytes that adhere to chondroitin sulfate A (CSA). Susceptibility to PAM decreases with increasing parity, apparently due to acquisition of antibodies directed against the variant surface antigens (VSAs) that mediate the adhesion to CSA (VSA(CSA)). This study found that levels of VSA(CSA)-specific antibodies depend on endemicity, that anti-VSA(CSA) IgG is acquired during gestation week 20, and that plasma levels of the antibodies decline during the postpartum period. There is evidence that VSA(CSA)-specific antibodies are linked to placental infection and that high antibody levels contribute to the control of placental infection by inhibiting parasite adhesion to CSA. Data suggest that VSA(CSA) is a target for vaccination against PAM.",
author = "T Staalsoe and R Megnekou and N Fiev{\'e}t and Ricke, {C H} and Zornig, {H D} and R Leke and Taylor, {D W} and P Deloron and L Hviid",
note = "Keywords: Animals; Antibodies, Protozoan; Antigens, Protozoan; Antimalarials; Cell Adhesion; Chloroquine; Chondroitin Sulfates; Erythrocytes; Female; Humans; Malaria, Falciparum; Parasitemia; Placenta Diseases; Plasmodium falciparum; Pregnancy; Pregnancy Complications, Parasitic",
year = "2001",
doi = "10.1086/322809",
language = "English",
volume = "184",
pages = "618--26",
journal = "Journal of Infectious Diseases",
issn = "0022-1899",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Acquisition and decay of antibodies to pregnancy-associated variant antigens on the surface of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes that protect against placental parasitemia

AU - Staalsoe, T

AU - Megnekou, R

AU - Fievét, N

AU - Ricke, C H

AU - Zornig, H D

AU - Leke, R

AU - Taylor, D W

AU - Deloron, P

AU - Hviid, L

N1 - Keywords: Animals; Antibodies, Protozoan; Antigens, Protozoan; Antimalarials; Cell Adhesion; Chloroquine; Chondroitin Sulfates; Erythrocytes; Female; Humans; Malaria, Falciparum; Parasitemia; Placenta Diseases; Plasmodium falciparum; Pregnancy; Pregnancy Complications, Parasitic

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - Otherwise clinically immune women in areas endemic for malaria are highly susceptible to Plasmodium falciparum malaria during their first pregnancy. Pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) is characterized by placental accumulation of infected erythrocytes that adhere to chondroitin sulfate A (CSA). Susceptibility to PAM decreases with increasing parity, apparently due to acquisition of antibodies directed against the variant surface antigens (VSAs) that mediate the adhesion to CSA (VSA(CSA)). This study found that levels of VSA(CSA)-specific antibodies depend on endemicity, that anti-VSA(CSA) IgG is acquired during gestation week 20, and that plasma levels of the antibodies decline during the postpartum period. There is evidence that VSA(CSA)-specific antibodies are linked to placental infection and that high antibody levels contribute to the control of placental infection by inhibiting parasite adhesion to CSA. Data suggest that VSA(CSA) is a target for vaccination against PAM.

AB - Otherwise clinically immune women in areas endemic for malaria are highly susceptible to Plasmodium falciparum malaria during their first pregnancy. Pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) is characterized by placental accumulation of infected erythrocytes that adhere to chondroitin sulfate A (CSA). Susceptibility to PAM decreases with increasing parity, apparently due to acquisition of antibodies directed against the variant surface antigens (VSAs) that mediate the adhesion to CSA (VSA(CSA)). This study found that levels of VSA(CSA)-specific antibodies depend on endemicity, that anti-VSA(CSA) IgG is acquired during gestation week 20, and that plasma levels of the antibodies decline during the postpartum period. There is evidence that VSA(CSA)-specific antibodies are linked to placental infection and that high antibody levels contribute to the control of placental infection by inhibiting parasite adhesion to CSA. Data suggest that VSA(CSA) is a target for vaccination against PAM.

U2 - 10.1086/322809

DO - 10.1086/322809

M3 - Journal article

VL - 184

SP - 618

EP - 626

JO - Journal of Infectious Diseases

JF - Journal of Infectious Diseases

SN - 0022-1899

IS - 5

ER -

ID: 6747236