A multicenter questionnaire investigation of attitudes toward hand hygiene, assessed by the staff in fifteen hospitals in Denmark and Norway.

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Standard

A multicenter questionnaire investigation of attitudes toward hand hygiene, assessed by the staff in fifteen hospitals in Denmark and Norway. / Zimakoff, J; Kjelsberg, A B; Larsen, S O; Holstein, B.

I: American Journal of Infection Control, Bind 20, Nr. 2, 1992, s. 58-64.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Zimakoff, J, Kjelsberg, AB, Larsen, SO & Holstein, B 1992, 'A multicenter questionnaire investigation of attitudes toward hand hygiene, assessed by the staff in fifteen hospitals in Denmark and Norway.', American Journal of Infection Control, bind 20, nr. 2, s. 58-64.

APA

Zimakoff, J., Kjelsberg, A. B., Larsen, S. O., & Holstein, B. (1992). A multicenter questionnaire investigation of attitudes toward hand hygiene, assessed by the staff in fifteen hospitals in Denmark and Norway. American Journal of Infection Control, 20(2), 58-64.

Vancouver

Zimakoff J, Kjelsberg AB, Larsen SO, Holstein B. A multicenter questionnaire investigation of attitudes toward hand hygiene, assessed by the staff in fifteen hospitals in Denmark and Norway. American Journal of Infection Control. 1992;20(2):58-64.

Author

Zimakoff, J ; Kjelsberg, A B ; Larsen, S O ; Holstein, B. / A multicenter questionnaire investigation of attitudes toward hand hygiene, assessed by the staff in fifteen hospitals in Denmark and Norway. I: American Journal of Infection Control. 1992 ; Bind 20, Nr. 2. s. 58-64.

Bibtex

@article{831203109b6911dd86a6000ea68e967b,
title = "A multicenter questionnaire investigation of attitudes toward hand hygiene, assessed by the staff in fifteen hospitals in Denmark and Norway.",
abstract = "A questionnaire survey was carried out anonymously among 2557 health care workers in Denmark and Norway to identify and quantify factors that affect the handwashing behavior of physicians, nurses, and other staff groups who perform direct patient care. For number of daily patient contacts physicians reported significantly fewer instances of hand hygiene (HH) per day than did those in other medical professions. Male physicians reported significantly fewer HH per day than did their female colleagues. Significant differences were found among staff groups in emphasis on factors motivating and discouraging HH. The main motivating factor for all groups, however, was an awareness that HH is important for the prevention of infection. Skin problems from frequent handwashing and the use of agents that irritate and dry the skin were the main reasons for disinclination toward HH. The number of points given to these statements correlated well with the stated frequency of HH in staff groups with relatively many (9 to 24) patient contacts per day. Many studies have revealed low standards of HH in health care settings. Whenever HH is taught, the significance of HH for the prevention of infection is always stressed. The participants in this survey were well aware of this significance, but there is still a discrepancy between theory and practice. Goal-specific strategies to improve HH practices would probably be more effective if more were done to minimize the factors that health care workers find detrimental to HH. Continual evaluation of the possibly detrimental effects of current hand washing agents should also be carried out.",
author = "J Zimakoff and Kjelsberg, {A B} and Larsen, {S O} and B Holstein",
note = "Keywords: Attitude of Health Personnel; Denmark; Female; Handwashing; Humans; Infection Control; Male; Medical Staff, Hospital; Norway; Nursing Staff, Hospital; Personnel, Hospital; Questionnaires",
year = "1992",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
pages = "58--64",
journal = "American Journal of Infection Control",
issn = "0196-6553",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - A multicenter questionnaire investigation of attitudes toward hand hygiene, assessed by the staff in fifteen hospitals in Denmark and Norway.

AU - Zimakoff, J

AU - Kjelsberg, A B

AU - Larsen, S O

AU - Holstein, B

N1 - Keywords: Attitude of Health Personnel; Denmark; Female; Handwashing; Humans; Infection Control; Male; Medical Staff, Hospital; Norway; Nursing Staff, Hospital; Personnel, Hospital; Questionnaires

PY - 1992

Y1 - 1992

N2 - A questionnaire survey was carried out anonymously among 2557 health care workers in Denmark and Norway to identify and quantify factors that affect the handwashing behavior of physicians, nurses, and other staff groups who perform direct patient care. For number of daily patient contacts physicians reported significantly fewer instances of hand hygiene (HH) per day than did those in other medical professions. Male physicians reported significantly fewer HH per day than did their female colleagues. Significant differences were found among staff groups in emphasis on factors motivating and discouraging HH. The main motivating factor for all groups, however, was an awareness that HH is important for the prevention of infection. Skin problems from frequent handwashing and the use of agents that irritate and dry the skin were the main reasons for disinclination toward HH. The number of points given to these statements correlated well with the stated frequency of HH in staff groups with relatively many (9 to 24) patient contacts per day. Many studies have revealed low standards of HH in health care settings. Whenever HH is taught, the significance of HH for the prevention of infection is always stressed. The participants in this survey were well aware of this significance, but there is still a discrepancy between theory and practice. Goal-specific strategies to improve HH practices would probably be more effective if more were done to minimize the factors that health care workers find detrimental to HH. Continual evaluation of the possibly detrimental effects of current hand washing agents should also be carried out.

AB - A questionnaire survey was carried out anonymously among 2557 health care workers in Denmark and Norway to identify and quantify factors that affect the handwashing behavior of physicians, nurses, and other staff groups who perform direct patient care. For number of daily patient contacts physicians reported significantly fewer instances of hand hygiene (HH) per day than did those in other medical professions. Male physicians reported significantly fewer HH per day than did their female colleagues. Significant differences were found among staff groups in emphasis on factors motivating and discouraging HH. The main motivating factor for all groups, however, was an awareness that HH is important for the prevention of infection. Skin problems from frequent handwashing and the use of agents that irritate and dry the skin were the main reasons for disinclination toward HH. The number of points given to these statements correlated well with the stated frequency of HH in staff groups with relatively many (9 to 24) patient contacts per day. Many studies have revealed low standards of HH in health care settings. Whenever HH is taught, the significance of HH for the prevention of infection is always stressed. The participants in this survey were well aware of this significance, but there is still a discrepancy between theory and practice. Goal-specific strategies to improve HH practices would probably be more effective if more were done to minimize the factors that health care workers find detrimental to HH. Continual evaluation of the possibly detrimental effects of current hand washing agents should also be carried out.

M3 - Journal article

VL - 20

SP - 58

EP - 64

JO - American Journal of Infection Control

JF - American Journal of Infection Control

SN - 0196-6553

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 6629192